Stemline Therapeutics to Present SL-801 Phase 1 Data at Upcoming ESMO Congress

NEW YORK, Aug. 30, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Stemline Therapeutics, Inc. (Nasdaq:STML), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing novel therapeutics for difficult to treat cancers, announced today that data from SL-801’s ongoing Phase 1 trial in patients with advanced solid tumors has been selected by the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) for poster presentation at their Annual Congress 2017, to be held September 8-12, 2017 in Madrid, Spain. SL-801 is a novel, potent and reversible Exportin-1 (XPO1) inhibitor.

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September Blog: Answers to Your Intimacy Questions

Dr. Laura Michaelis, MD

How do I know if I’m having ET symptoms or menopause symptoms, i.e. night sweats, foggy brain etc.?

There is no one answer for this – and many of the symptoms of essential thrombocythemia may be confused with “normal” symptoms of menopause. However, there are some tell-tale signs that ET is the root cause. For example, night sweats are different than hot flashes. Night sweats typically occur while sleeping and characteristically cause soaking sweats – like you have to change your pajamas or the bedding. Night sweats are not subtle. In contrast, most women describe hot flashes as a flush that comes on at any time of the day (or night) and while uncomfortable, doesn’t typically cause profuse sweating. If you are having migraine headaches, visual auras, painful rash of the extremities — called “erythromelalgia,” these are more common with ET and warrant a discussion with your physician.

Sex is difficult since my diagnosis. My husband is cautious and doesn’t want to impose himself on me, and I cannot get my head into it. I’m consumed with thoughts of the disease and possible progression.  Can you offer an insights?

Many individuals, when faced with a life changing diagnosis, find that anxiety and depression about the diagnosis can affect the normal activities of life, whether or not it’s sexual activities or libido, work, sleep or other relationships. It is very, very common for people to experience grief reactions or event depression with diagnosis. Depression and anxiety are very treatable conditions.

In your situation, I would strongly recommend seeking out a psychotherapist or psychiatrist and discussing that your worries about your disease are impeding your normal function. You might also have your husband join you at some of these sessions. Finally, don’t forget to mention this to your hematologist as well, who might be able to give some advice with regard to a medical approach. The most stressful things in life: death, divorce, illness often cause humans to experience grief, which can also take the form of anxiety or depression. There is excellent treatment for this in the form of therapy and medication. Please talk to a professional.

I know intimacy is many things unrelated to sex but sometimes the fatigue overtakes me and I simply don’t care if I ever have sex. I also fall asleep when we try to be close.

Fatigue is a very common symptom of the MPNs, including the “lower-risk” MPNs including polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia. This can impede normal sexual activity and libido. One option is to try creative, non-medical, interventions. Think about what times of the day you are at your best. Perhaps timing your intimate encounters to be at a time of day when you feel more energized? Experiment with alterations in your diet – are there some foods that make you sleepy? If so, you can avoid those when you want to remain energized. Certainly, avoiding alcohol might help to prevent fatigue on “date nights.” A lack of libido can also be a sign of depression and certain

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Blog: Answers to Your Intimacy Questions

How do I know if I’m having ET symptoms or menopause symptoms, i.e. night sweats, foggy brain etc.?

There is no one answer for this – and many of the symptoms of essential thrombocythemia may be confused with “normal” symptoms of menopause. However, there are some tell-tale signs that ET is the root cause. For example, night sweats are different than hot flashes. Night sweats typically occur while sleeping and characteristically cause soaking sweats – like you have to change your pajamas or the bedding. Night sweats are not subtle. In contrast, most women describe hot flashes as a flush that comes on at any time of the day (or night) and while uncomfortable, doesn’t typically cause profuse sweating. If you are having migraine headaches, visual auras, painful rash of the extremities — called “erythromelalgia,” these are more common with ET and warrant a discussion with your physician.

Sex is difficult since my diagnosis. My husband is cautious and doesn’t want to impose himself on me, and I cannot get my head into it. I’m consumed with thoughts of the disease and possible progression.  Can you offer an insights?

Many individuals, when faced with a life changing diagnosis, find that anxiety and depression about the diagnosis can affect the normal activities of life, whether or not it’s sexual activities or libido, work, sleep or other relationships. It is very, very common for people to experience grief reactions or event depression with diagnosis. Depression and anxiety are very treatable conditions.

In your situation, I would strongly recommend seeking out a psychotherapist or psychiatrist and discussing that your worries about your disease are impeding your normal function. You might also have your husband join you at some of these sessions. Finally, don’t forget to mention this to your hematologist as well, who might be able to give some advice with regard to a medical approach. The most stressful things in life: death, divorce, illness often cause humans to experience grief, which can also take the form of anxiety or depression. There is excellent treatment for this in the form of therapy and medication. Please talk to a professional.

I know intimacy is many things unrelated to sex but sometimes the fatigue overtakes me and I simply don’t care if I ever have sex. I also fall asleep when we try to be close.

Fatigue is a very common symptom of the MPNs, including the “lower-risk” MPNs including polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia. This can impede normal sexual activity and libido. One option is to try creative, non-medical, interventions. Think about what times of the day you are at your best. Perhaps timing your intimate encounters to be at a time of day when you feel more energized? Experiment with alterations in your diet – are there some foods that make you sleepy? If so, you can avoid those when you want to remain energized. Certainly, avoiding alcohol might help to prevent fatigue on “date nights.” A lack of libido can also be a sign of depression and certain antidepressants can help with this. I recommend discussing this all with your physician.

Go to MPN Advocacy & Education International’s Blog

 

 

Intimacy and MPNs: Opening Up the Conversation

View Details of the 3rd Annual Women & MPN Conference September 29, Los Angeles, CA

Over the last few years, with the creation of the Women & MPN programs, a vocal patient advocacy network and focused research, we’ve discovered the differences in how men and women are impacted by  MPNs.

Many women have expressed their discomfort discussing intimacy and sexual issues with their physicians. Some physicians have told us that little training in sexual health and intimacy are available, yet it can be the one thing that bonds the patient and their partner in a positive way. MPN studies placed intimacy as a major quality of life issue. While patients receive information and guidance on diet, exercise, treatment options and other healthy lifestyle choices, rarely is intimacy or sexual health discussed.

MPN Advocacy & Education International sent out a request for questions from female patients who were not comfortable asking their physicians. We weren’t surprised by the response. All of their questions were sent to our MPN specialists who will be presenting at the 3rd Annual Women & MPN program in Los Angeles on September 29th.  Men are very welcome to attend this program. A lively panel discussion will follow the presentations and a caregiver breakout session is being offered.

Women More Likely to Survive Essential Thrombocythemia Than Men

Until now, gender had not been considered a factor in survival rates of individuals with essential thrombocythemia (ET), a type of myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). But according to a recent study conducted by researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota and the University of Florence in Italy, being male may lead to inferior overall survival (OS). In other words, women survive more frequently than men with ET. The study was published in the American Journal of Hematology.

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Arthritis Medicine May Move on to PV Treatment Scene

Can a drug used to treat arthritis also be a way to treat polycythemia vera (PV), and save patients with the blood cancer money?

Researchers at the University of Sheffield in England believe that the chemotherapy agent and immune system suppressant, methotrexate (MTX), would benefit tens of thousands of people affected by the disease.

The reason an arthritis treatment may work to treat the rare cancer type is because they both have connections to the Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway. In patients with arthritis, it sparks up inflammation and an autoimmune response, and for PV, mutations in the pathway account for the majority of diagnoses.

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Registration-Atlanta MPN Patient Program

Atlanta MPN Patient Education Program

Thank you for registering for the MPN Patient/Caregiver Education Program on October 26, 2017 in Atlanta, GA.  We look forward to seeing you.  To complete the registration you can use the link below to pay the registration fee.  Follow the brief instructions to link to the PayPal account.

 NOTE: You do not need a PayPal account to make this payment, you can select the “Pay with Debit or Credit Card” option.  If you are registering for you and a guest or 2 guests please use “Select Registration Option” from the drop down menu provided on the registration page:


Select Registration Option



Mayo Clinic and ASU Seeking MPN Patients for Pilot study in Meditation

Mediation Flyer

During 2015 and 2016, Arizona State University, in partnership with the Mayo Clinic and Udaya Entertainment, successfully conducted two 12-week, home-based, online-streamed yoga interventions in MPN patients. Through these studies, we demonstrated both the feasibility of online yoga in MPN patients as well as the ability for yoga to improve MPN patient symptom burden (e.g., fatigue, anxiety, depression, sleep quality, pain) and quality of life. The data generated from these studies led to the submission of a large effectiveness trial to the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, which is currently in review. The success of our online yoga studies combined with an interest in meditation amongst MPN patients has led to the expansion of our non-pharmacological research umbrella to include an examination of the effects of meditation on MPN patient symptom burden and quality of life. We are hoping you could share the below information. Note that we don’t mention meditation below as we would like all potential participants to try the intervention and we will determine their perceptions about it afterwards. Here is the information to share:

We are currently conducting a study that explores the practicality and the impact of different strategies (i.e., mobile app, education) to reduce fatigue, MPN-symptom burden and improve quality of life. We are seeking MPN cancer patients, ages 18 and up, to participate. Participants must be willing to be randomized to one of four different groups that includes a combination of materials/resources and/or two different smartphone-based applications to help manage fatigue and stress associated with MPN. Participants will be asked to complete questionnaires at three different time points and wear a Fitbit device throughout the study, which they will keep at the end of the study in gratitude for their participation. This study, much like our previous online health studies, will include a limited number of MPN patients (N=90). The results of this study will provide the data needed to submit a large effectiveness trial to the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. This research will be conducted through a partnership between Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University (ASU) and may help advance our understanding on the potential role of non-pharmacological complementary approaches to symptom management in MPN patients.

If you are interested in learning more about or joining this study, please contact us by phone (602-827-2314), email mpnpilotapp@asu.edu or visit this link to complete eligibility survey: http://bit.ly/mpnpilotapp (case sensitive)